Friday, 17 November 2017

Antibiotics & Your Heart

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about antibiotics and your heart.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Friday, 10 November 2017

Power Toothbrushes

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about power toothbrushes.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Friday, 3 November 2017

Risks to Oral Health During Pregnancy

Learn what the American Dental Association has to about risks to your oral health during pregnancy.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Tuesday, 24 October 2017

Halloween Candy: Your Dental Health Survival Guide

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

With Halloween comes ghosts, goblins and goodies-and the sugar in those treats can play some unwanted tricks on your teeth if you’re not careful. 

Here’s why: The bacteria in your mouth are probably more excited to eat Halloween candy than you are. When the bacteria eat the sugar and leftover food in your mouth, a weak acid is produced. That acid is what can contribute to cavities. 

But don’t hang up your costume just yet. “Halloween is about candy, dressing up and having fun,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween as a splurge as long as you’re brushing twice a day and flossing once a day all year long.”

To help you sort through the trick-or-treat bag loot, we have a rundown of some common candies and their impact on your teeth:
Chocolate
Chocolate is probably your best bet, which is good because it’s also one of the most popular kinds of candy handed out on Halloween. ìChocolate is one of the better candies because it washes off your teeth easier than other types of candy,î Dr. Ferraz- Dougherty says. “Dark chocolate also has less sugar than milk chocolate.”

Sticky and Gummy Candies
Be picky if it’s sticky. These are some of the worst candies for your teeth. “This candy is harder to remove and may stay longer on your teeth, which gives that cavity-causing bacteria more time to work,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Hard Candy
  • Sour Candy
  • Popcorn Balls

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Wednesday, 18 October 2017

What are Cavities?

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about what cavities are.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Tuesday, 17 October 2017

12 Tips for a Healthy Halloween

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Halloween is around the corner, which for most children means bags of free candy and a chance to build a stockpile of sweets for the winter. No surprise, Halloween can also present parents with a variety of health and safety challenges. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween but it’s important to have a plan,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. 

Here's how you can help your family stay MouthHealthy on Halloween and year-round.
Time It Right
Eat Halloween candy (and other sugary foods) with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals. This helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and rinse away food particles.

Stay Away from Sweet Snacks
Snacking can increase your risk of cavities, and it’s double the trouble if you keep grabbing sugary treats from the candy bowl. “Snacking on candy throughout the day is not ideal for your dental health or diet,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

Choose Candy Carefully
Avoid hard candy and other sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Aside from how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Avoid Sticky Situations
  • Have a Plan
  • Drink More Water
  • Maintain a Healthy Diet
  • Stay Away from Sugary Beverages
  • Chew Gum with the ADA Seal
  • Brush Twice a Day
  • Clean Between Your Teeth
  • Visit an ADA Dentist

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Saturday, 14 October 2017

Dental Root Canals

Saving Hopeless Teeth

Saving damaged teeth isn't impossible anymore! Even ones with infected roots can often be treated and repaired. In the past, the only option for severely damaged teeth was extraction. Missing teeth can cause as many issues for your mouth as infected ones do. A root canal can restore a tooth by removing the pulp chamber and filling it with filling material. This is often necessary when dental decay reaches the nerve of the tooth (or the tooth has become infected), and a simple filling will not be suitable. Improved technology and modern anesthetics means root canals are often a manageable form of treatment. They no longer deserve the reputation of dread once associated with the process.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Inter-Dental Cleaners

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about inter-dental cleaners.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Tuesday, 10 October 2017

Cold and Flu Season: 5 Ways to Care for Your Mouth When You’re Sick

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org
When he’s feeling under the weather, ADA dentist Dr. Gene Romo says one thing always helps him feel a little more like himself. “Brushing my teeth when I’m sick actually makes me feel better,” he says. “My mouth feels clean, and in a way, I feel like my health is starting to improve.”

When you have a cold or the flu, taking care of your body is your top priority-and that includes your mouth. “It’s important to take care of your dental health all year round, but especially when you’re sick,” Dr. Romo says.

Here are some simple ways to care for your dental health when you’re not feeling well: 

Practice Good Hygiene
When you’re sick, you know to cover your mouth when you cough and sneeze. Don’t forget to keep up your dental and toothbrush hygiene as well.
According to the CDC, the flu virus can live on moist surfaces for 72 hours. “The number one rule is not to share your toothbrush anytime, but especially when you are sick,” Dr. Romo says.
You also probably don’t need to replace your toothbrush after you’ve been sick. Unless your immune system is severely compromised, the chances of reinfecting yourself are very low. “But if you’re still in doubt, throw it out,” says Dr. Romo. “Especially if you’ve had your toothbrush for 3-4 months, when it’s time to replace it anyway.”

Choose Sugar-Free Cough Drops
Read the label before you pick up a bag at the drug store with an eye to avoid ingredients like fructose or corn syrup. “Many cough drops contain sugar, and it is like sucking on candy,” says Dr. Romo. “Sugar is a culprit when it comes to cavities.” The longer you keep a sugary cough drop in your mouth, the more time cavity-causing bacteria has to feast on that sugar, which produces the acid that can leave holes in your teeth.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Swish and Spit After Vomiting
  • Stay Hydrated to Avoid Dry Mouth
  • Choose the Right Fluids

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Saturday, 7 October 2017

Dental Lasers

Introducing Laser Dental Procedures

Dental lasers are FDA-approved and provide an exciting new way to ease discomfort during dental procedures. Treatments that were previously performed with scalpels or incisions can now be completed with a laser. Less-invasive treatment means improved results and faster healing. We are able to cosmetically treat uneven gummy smile lines, clean and re-contour inflamed tissue around crowns, arrest gum disease, and heal painful canker sores and mouth ulcers with instant relief! The results are absolutely outstanding!

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Tooth Whitening Is Not Equal to Tooth Brushing

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about tooth whitening not being equal to tooth brushing.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Saturday, 30 September 2017

Oral Health Dental Treatments

Full-Mouth Rehabilitation

Your oral health impacts your overall well being. Gum disease has been tied to other health issues, including heart disease and stroke. A TMJ disorder can be the root cause of your headaches and shoulder pain. Chronic bad breath might indicate a more serious infection within your teeth and gums – an infection that can spread to other areas in your body. Missing, worn, and broken teeth change your bite pattern and can lead to changes in your eating habits that affect your nutritional intake. Dr. Paulson can help you address these oral health issues and many more. Ask about full-mouth rehabilitation treatment, which will help you recover a pain-free, healthy, and attractive smile.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS 
928 S. Garfield Avenue
Traverse City, MI 49686 
(231) 935-4872
GTSmileCenter.com

Sunday, 24 September 2017

You May Have Acid Erosion on Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Jennifer Mitchell

Tooth enamel isn't just strong; it's the hardest substance in your body. It isn't indestructible, however, and can be eroded by substances that are stronger. Acid exposure can come from many sources, but with the help of your dentist, you can keep your enamel strong and healthy.

Symptoms 
Acid erosion on teeth can lead to a variety of symptoms that should be evaluated by a dentist. As the outer layer of your teeth wears away, you may experience tooth sensitivity. This sensitivity often leads to pain when you consume hot or cold foods and drinks.
Your teeth may also become discolored. This is because the enamel is white, unlike the sensitive, yellow tissue underneath is known as dentin. As the enamel erodes and exposes more of your dentin, your teeth begin to show more of its yellow color.
The appearance of your teeth can change in other ways as a result of acid erosion, depending on the case. The bottom edge of your front teeth may start to look transparent instead of its natural opaque. You may also notice your teeth look smaller or thinner than they used to. If you notice any of these symptoms, you may have acid erosion, and should see your dentist right away for an evaluation.

Causes 
There are just as many possible causes of acid erosion. Your favorite beverages, for example, may also be to blame for the initial sensitivity: According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), soft drinks are the most frequent source of erosive acids, most damaging due to their low pH levels. Other popular drinks, such as fruit juices, sports drinks and energy drinks, can also damage your teeth due to their acidity.
These liquids aren't the only possible cause. Frequent vomiting introduces highly acidic stomach contents to your mouth and can lead to acid erosion. This is a particular concern for pregnant women suffering from morning sickness, as well as those who struggle with bulimia or related eating disorders. Similarly, gastroesophageal acid reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that makes acid from your stomach back up into your throat and mouth involuntarily. This leads to frequent heartburn and, ultimately, the erosion of your tooth enamel. If you suffer from GERD, make sure your dentist is aware of your condition.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Prevention
  • Treatment

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Sunday, 17 September 2017

Periodontal Disease and Obesity

Many medical professionals consider obesity to be a chronic disease. It is well understood that obesity is on the rise in the United States, and that younger and younger members of our community are becoming obese due to poor nutrition and eating habits. Research has demonstrated that obesity will increase the risk for hypertension, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, CVD, respiratory problems, and endometrial, breast, prostate, and colon cancers.1 It has also been demonstrated in a recent research study that obesity also increases the risk for periodontal disease, and it may be insulin resistance that regulates the relationship between obesity and periodontal disease.1  It has also been found that individuals with elevated body mass indices (BMI) produce a higher level of inflammatory proteins.1

The classifications of being overweight and obese can pertain to more than 60 percent of American adults. It is even higher for some high-risk populations, such as African-American women, placing these individuals at greater risk for diabetes and cardiovascular dis¨ease. Some authorities estimate that two out of three Americans are overweight or obese, and projections of obesity trends for the future indicate an increase in the incidence of obesity in the general population.1

It is very critical for individuals to understand the obesity epidemic and to take proactive steps in addressing this issue with themselves and family members who are obese. Good nutrition and exercise should be stressed and individuals should be educated on the role that obesity may play in the development of diabetes, CVD and cancer. 

The dental professional will take a thorough medical history and review any medical issues which may point to the cause for the obesity and  refer the patient to his/her physician for evaluation. The oral health status will also be evaluated and treatment rendered based on the diagnosis. Emphasis will be placed on the reduction of the plaque and accompanying inflammation, both above and below the gumline. Home care should be reinforced, and patients should be encouraged to floss regularly and to brush twice daily with a toothpaste that offers antibacterial protection.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Post-Treatment Care & Tooth Extractions

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about post-treatment care for tooth extractions.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Oral Cancer Screening

The Risks and Realities of Oral Cancer

Oral cancer takes one American life every hour. This unsettling statistic has remained almost unchanged for the last 40 years. With early detection, oral cancer has a 90% cure rate, which is why we treat oral cancer screenings seriously. We perform a visual inspection for oral cancer at every six-month checkup and cleaning. If our hygienist or Dr. Paulson sees anything that gives them cause for concern, they’ll refer you to an oral surgeon. This screening could literally save your life!

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Sunday, 10 September 2017

Teeth without Enamel: Causes, Treatment and Care

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Katriena Knights

Enamel is the hardest substance in the human body, and is therefore vital to the health of your teeth. Not everyone's is the strongest, though, and still others have teeth without enamel at all. Without enamel to protect the softer interior parts of your teeth, they can't stand up to the stress of natural biting and chewing. These abnormal developments require special care and treatment.

Enamel Hypoplasia
Teeth can come in without enamel as a result of inherited issues or because of exposure to certain substances while the teeth are erupting. Baby teeth and permanent teeth can both emerge with enamel that is weak, improperly formed or missing altogether. One of these conditions is enamel hypoplasia, which literally means "underdeveloped enamel." A disorder that causes the teeth to develop with thin, deficient enamel, it sometimes manifests as a pit in the tooth ñ or even a hole. In advanced cases, there is no enamel at all, leaving the more sensitive dentin exposed.
Under normal conditions, per the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), special cells in the teeth called ameloblasts form the cells of the tooth enamel. If these ameloblasts are damaged or do not fully develop, the enamel can't develop normally either.

What Causes It
Many factors can cause enamel hypoplasia. These include:

  • Poor nutrition during pregnancy or infancy.
  • Infection during pregnancy or infancy.
  • Genetic disorders.
  • Trauma to the teeth or jaw.
  • Exposure to certain substances during pregnancy or infancy.

Nonetheless, it's often difficult to determine exactly what caused the teeth to develop abnormally.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Enamel Hypomineralization
  • How to Treat It

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Dental Tourism

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the risks and additional costs associated with dental tourism.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Custom Dental Mouthguards

Improved Athletics and Protected Teeth

Your ability to draw in a full breath increases your power and strength whether you're simply training or playing an active sport such as basketball or football. A properly fitted sportsguard aligns your jaw and improves your air capacity. The one-size-fits-all guards found in stores tend to be a sloppy fit and can even interfere with proper breathing during an active performance. We offer custom-fitted mouthguards and sportsguards. Not only will these custom guards properly align your mouth and improve your breathing capacity, they'll reduce the risk you'll accidently damage or a knock out a tooth. Within the United States, an estimated 5 million teeth are knocked out or injured every year. Don't let this happen to you! Ask us about custom-fitted mouthguards.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Sunday, 3 September 2017

Teeth Grinding (also known as Bruxism)

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about teeth grinding also known as bruxism.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Wednesday, 30 August 2017

Teeth Whitening Dentist

Whiter Teeth Equate to an Amazing Smile!

In one visit we can help you regain the stunning white of your smile. Our in-office power whitening treatment makes it possible to remove years of staining and discoloration caused by food and beverages, tobacco use, or medication side effects. The results of our professional bleaching process can last for years! If you prefer, we also offer custom whitening trays made in our own lab. You receive supplies and instructions, allowing you to safely and effectively complete the procedure at home. Results occur within 1 - 14 days.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS 
928 S. Garfield Avenue
Traverse City, MI 49686 
(231) 935-4872
GTSmileCenter.com

Thursday, 24 August 2017

Wisdom Teeth

Below is an article found on MouthHealthy.org.


With age comes wisdom. Specifically, wisdom teeth.

Your mouth goes through many changes in your lifetime. One major dental milestone that usually takes place between the ages of 17 and 21 is the appearance of your third molars. Historically, these teeth have been called wisdom teeth because they come through at a more mature age.

When they come through correctly, healthy wisdom teeth can help you chew. Itís normal to feel a little discomfort when your wisdom teeth appear, but if you have pain, see your dentist immediately.

Room to Grow?
Wisdom teeth can lead to problems if there isnít enough space for them to surface or they come through in the wrong position. If your dentist says your wisdom teeth are impacted, he or she means they are trapped in your jaw or under your gums.

As your wisdom teeth make their way through your gums, your dentist will be monitoring your mouth for signs of the following:

  • Wisdom teeth that arenít in the right position can allow food to become trapped. That gives cavity-causing bacteria a place to grow.
  • Wisdom teeth that havenít come in properly, which can make it difficult to floss between the wisdom teeth and the molars next to them.
  • Wisdom teeth that have partially come through can give bacteria a place to enter the gums and create a place for infection to occur. This may also lead to pain, swelling and stiffness in your jaw.
  • Wisdom teeth that donít have room to come through are thought by some to crowd or damage neighboring teeth.
  • A wisdom tooth that is impacted can form a cyst on or near the impacted tooth. This could damage the roots of nearby teeth or destroy the bone that supports your teeth.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The article also contains links about:

  • Why You Might Need to Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed
  • Keeping Your Wisdom Teeth?

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Friday, 18 August 2017

Root Canals

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org.



Root canal treatment is necessary when the pulp (soft tissue inside your teeth containing blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue) becomes inflamed or diseased. During root canal treatment, your dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in treating the insides of teeth) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed. If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed.

Causes of an infected pulp could include:

  • a deep cavity
  • repeated dental procedures
  • a cracked or broken tooth
  • injury to the tooth (even if thereís not a visible crack or chip)

If you continue to care for your teeth and gums your restored tooth could last a lifetime. However, regular checkups are necessary; a tooth without its nerve can still develop cavities or gum disease. Most of the time, a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one to three visits. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.


Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Baby Teeth Are Going to Fall Out, So Why Take Care of Them?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Baby Teeth Are Going to Fall Out, So Why Take Care of Them?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Proper Dental Bite Alignment

TMJ/TMD – Proper Bite Alignment Treatment Helps You Say 'Goodbye' to Headaches and Jaw Pain!

The proper natural alignment of your jaw is critical to your overall health! Do you know that dental occlusion (i.e. your bite) is sometimes the cause of frequent headaches, aching or popping jaws, shoulder pain, and neck pain? Natural alignment can be altered in several ways – missing or worn teeth, grinding of teeth, muscle tension, and many others. Don't continue living with the pain. By restoring your dental occlusion, the jaw can be returned to the position that nature intended. Ask us about appropriate treatment options.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Friday, 11 August 2017

Dentures

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org.



Dentures are removable appliances that can replace missing teeth and help restore your smile. If youíve lost all of your natural teeth, whether from gum disease, tooth decay or injury, replacing missing teeth will benefit your appearance and your health. Thatís because dentures make it easier to eat and speak better than you could without teethóthings that people often take for granted.

When you lose all of your teeth, facial muscles can sag, making you look older. Dentures can help fill out the appearance of your face and profile. They can be made to closely resemble your natural teeth so that your appearance does not change much. Dentures may even improve the look of your smile.

Types of dentures:

  • Conventional. This full removable denture is made and placed in your mouth after the remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed, which may take several months.
  • Immediate. This removable denture is inserted on the same day that the remaining teeth are removed. Your dentist will take measurements and make models of your jaw during a preliminary visit. You donít have to be without teeth during the healing period, but may need to have the denture relined or remade after your jaw has healed.
  • Overdenture. Sometimes some of your teeth can be saved to preserve your jawbone and provide stability and support for the denture. An overdenture fits over a small number of remaining natural teeth after they have been prepared by your dentist. Implants can serve the same function, too.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article contains more information under each of the headings:

  • Like your teeth, your dentures should be brushed daily to remove food particles and plaque. Brushing also can help keep the teeth from staining.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'When Should I Start Brushing My Child’s Teeth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'When Should I Start Brushing My Childís Teeth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Sunday, 6 August 2017

Dental Implants

Why Is Losing a Tooth So Bad?

Losing even a single tooth can cause the other teeth to shift and move around, which can affect your ability to absorb nutrients from your food if you can’t chew properly. Other bad things include: your face changing shape, often looking “sunken” and making you look older; affected speech; and favoring softer foods and more carbohydrates, causing weight gain. The best way to treat a missing tooth (or missing teeth) is with dental implants. An implant can replace one tooth or many. They can be made to look so natural that even a dentist has to look hard to tell the difference.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Thursday, 3 August 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Does Bottled Water Have Fluoride?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Does Bottled Water Have Fluoride?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Sunday, 30 July 2017

Dental Veneers

‘Smile Makeovers’ in as Few as Two Visits!

You don't need braces for straighter-looking teeth. We can make the gap between your front teeth vanish, as well as remove the odd variations in color your teeth may have acquired. In fact, in as few as two visits, your discolored, chipped, cracked, or worn teeth can be painlessly corrected to appear nearly perfect. With veneers, crooked teeth can look like they’ve had years of straightening. It’s like instant orthodontics! Extremely thin, hard porcelain veneers are bonded to your teeth in a way that makes them appear uniform. We can create the smile that will get you noticed.

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Difference Between DDS and DMD

Below is an article found on MouthHealthy.org.

If you’re looking to find a dentist you may notice that while most are listed with a “DDS”, some may be listed as “DMD”. They both mean the same thing-your dentist graduated from an accredited dental school. The DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery) and DMD (Doctor of Medicine in Dentistry or Doctor of Dental Medicine) are the same degrees. Dentists who have a DMD or DDS have the same education. It’s up to the universities to determine what degree is awarded, but both degrees use the same curriculum requirements.

Did you know that the level of education and clinical training required to earn a dental degree is on par with those of medical schools?
Generally, three or more years of undergraduate education plus four years of dental school is required to graduate and become a general dentist. Upon completion of their training, dentists must pass both a rigorous national written exam and a state or regional clinical licensing exam in order to practice. In order to keep their licenses, they must meet continuing education requirements for the remainder of their careers so that they may stay up to date on the latest scientific and clinical developments. Additional post-graduate training is required to become a dental specialist, such as an orthodontist, periodontist or oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

To read the entire article visit
MouthHealthy.org.

The article also contains links about: 

  • Looking for a dentist? 
  • Interested in a dental career?

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

3 Tips for Healthy Summer Smiles

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org.

Stay on a routine 
Whether your kids are staying up to catch fireflies or a fireworks show, resist the temptation to skip brushing before a late bedtime -or let it slide when they sleep in the next morning. “Don’t forget about your smile over the summer,” says ADA pediatric dentist Dr. Mary Hayes. “It’s important for families to consistently brush and floss, which keeps kids on track for healthy back-to-school dental visits.” 

Say no to sugary drinks and snacks 
As the temperature rises, it’s common for families to sip and snack during sports tournaments, festivals or nearly any community event. “Watch your family’s intake of lemonade, juice and soda,” says Dr. Hayes. “Consider sugary drinks treats to enjoy once in a while, and not often.” Instead, offer water (even better if it has fluoride) to beat the heat, or milk to drink with meals. And, don’t let summertime grazing damage your child’s smile. “Taking a break from snacking is healthy for your teeth,” says Dr. Hayes. “It allows time for saliva to bathe the teeth, wash away leftover food and get stronger.”  

Make your back-to-school dental visit early 
Some schools require back-to-school dental visits for certain grades, and these checkups can be a good way to be sure your child’s teeth stayed healthy. It is a good idea to make your child’s back-to-school appointment early in the summer to avoid the August rush and help insure you get the appointment time that works best for you. ìWe can help spot and take care of any issues, so your child doesn’t have to miss class once school starts,î Dr. Hayes says. “Visiting the dentist regularly can help your child’s smile stay healthy all year long.” 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article contains more information under each of the headings:

  • Stay on Routine
  • Say no to sugary drinks and snacks
  • Make your back-to-school dental visit early\

Grand Traverse Smile Center  
Ryan Paulson, DDS  
928 S. Garfield Avenue 
Traverse City, MI 49686  
(231) 935-4872 
GTSmileCenter.com